7 Top Tips for EU Citizens Working in the UK Post-Brexit

Working in a country that isn’t your homeland can be a particularly difficult task, especially if you are an EU citizen living and working in the UK post-Brexit. Read on for some tips on doing just that…

The impact of Brexit on EU citizens working in the UK has been considerably hard. Many already living and working in Britain have been faced with doubt over the future of their residence in the UK.

It’s important to know your rights to avoid any uncertainty or anxiety. In this article, we’ve have come up with seven top tips for EU citizens working in the UK post-Brexit. Take a look…

1.   Understand The EU Settlement Scheme (EUSS)

It’s essential to understand the EU settlement scheme. If you have not already applied to the scheme, you could be illegally living and working in the UK.

Any EU citizen must have applied to the EUSS deadline by the 30th of June 2021. If you have not already applied to the scheme, there are criteria for later deadlines and ‘reasonable grounds’ for not applying by the deadline. Some of these include:

  • Medical reasons
  • Domestic abuse
  • If you are joining family who lived in the UK by 31st December 2020 – this only applies if you were their family member by 31st December (excluding born or adopted children) and you are still their family when applying.

Without a reasonable exception or an application submitted, you must apply for a VISA.

2.   Understand the Dos and Don’ts of the EUSS

It might be simple to think you’ll be fine once you have applied to the EUSS. That said, there are many rules that come with applying for different statuses within the EUSS that people often overlook before continuing with their normal lives living and working in the UK.

As a member of the scheme, you need to ensure that you understand the ins and outs of it, particularly if you plan on staying in the UK for longer than five or 10 years. In this case, there are certain guidelines that you must follow to progress your status further. Without this, you will be at risk of getting caught out and not being eligible.

3.   Apply For a New Status

For those who applied to the EUSS scheme before the June 2021 deadline, you would have been given a status depending on the period of time spent living in the UK. This will either be ‘pre-settled’ (less than five years) or ‘settled’ (five years or more).

If you plan to continue staying in the UK for work rather than moving back to your home country, you will need to keep an eye on your status and the expiry date to know when you need to apply for a new status.

Once you have lived in the UK for five years, you could be eligible to apply for the settled status, which allows you to stay in the UK for however long you please. After 12 months, the settled status means you have the possibility to apply for British citizenship depending on if you meet the requirements.

It is wise to keep in mind that if you have left the UK for more than six months in a 12 month period without a reasonable explanation, your settled status application could be denied. This means you will need to reapply for pre-settled status.

You must apply for your settled status before your pre-settled status ends; otherwise, you will have missed the deadline and instead need to apply for a visa to stay in the country.

4.   Apply For British Citizenship

If you have lived in the UK for 10 years, you could be eligible to apply for British citizenship. This will provide the right to live and work in the UK indefinitely without immigration restrictions. Having British citizenship means you will have the following benefits:

  • The right to hold a British passport.
  • Permanent right to live in the UK.
  • No restrictions on the right to work.

This will make life easier, especially concerning jobs, as you won’t need to go through immigration documents with your employer as you are a British citizen. The process will be quicker and less stressful.

5.   Apply For a Visa

If you are not planning on living in the UK but are working in the UK for a short or long period or occasionally throughout a year, you will need to apply for a visa. There are different variations depending on the type of work that you intend to do in the UK. The government website explains each of these in more detail.

6.   Advise Friends and Family

Whilst working in the UK, you might have met friends who are from an EU country or perhaps you moved to the UK with family. Whether it be a partner, children, parents, etc. ensure that they are aware of the updated rules following on from Brexit. Without this, there is the risk that they might be unable to continue staying in the country.

7.   How To Prove Your Immigration Status

Once your status has been granted under the EUSS, you can use the view and prove service on the GOV.UK website to prove your right to work in the UK. It means that instead of holding physical documents and providing copies, it can be accessed digitally. This way, employers or anyone else who needs to view your documents is able to with your ‘share code’ and date of birth.

They will only be able to view what you want them to as when you click ‘prove your status’ it will ask you the reason. 

If you need more information regarding your immigration status for employers, GOV.UK have an immigration status document with all the helpful information that you need[AP1] .

Don’t Be Caught Out Post-Brexit

If you want your future life in Britain, it is essential that you don’t get caught out by deadlines for status changes and applying to EUSS if you are eligible under a late application. Employers will not employ you without the correct documents.

If you haven’t applied, or missed the expiry date of your status, you will be living and working in the UK illegally. This could potentially stop you from receiving citizenship in the future.Please be advised that this article is for general informational purposes only, and should not be used as a substitute for advice from a trained legal professional. Be sure to consult a legal professional if you’re seeking advice regarding your British residency or citizenship. We are not liable for risks or issues associated with using or acting upon the informat

Author: Editorial Team

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