Great Repeal Bill on leaving EU needs to ‘fully protect’ worker rights, says TUC

A white paper on the Great Repeal Bill will be published today following the trigger of Article 50.

The bill is necessary to fill the legal gap after the UK leaves the EU and will repeal the European Communities Act which says EU law is supreme to the UK’s.

This means that laws and regulations made while the UK was part of the EU will continue to apply, but they will become British laws rather than EU ones.

It will also set out how the Government will deal with EU laws that cannot be easily converted, and will also ensure the UK leaves the jurisdiction of the European Court of Justice.

Brexit Secretary David Davis said:

“Converting EU law into UK law, and ending the supremacy of lawmakers in Brussels, is an important step in giving businesses, workers and consumers the certainty they need.  And it will mean that as we seek a comprehensive new economic partnership with the EU, our allies will know that we start from a position where we have the same standards and rules.”

 

Ahead of the publication of the Bill, TUC General Secretary Frances O’Grady said:

“The Great Repeal Bill is the Prime Minister’s chance to make good on her promise to fully protect and maintain all workers’ rights that come from the EU.  These are rights we all rely on – like rules to guarantee safe workplaces, equal pay for women, protection from excessive working hours, and rights to equal treatment for agency workers.

 

 

“The TUC will be watching closely to make sure that every workplace right that comes from the EU is protected – now and into the future.  To honour her repeated public promise to protect workers’ rights, the Prime Minister should put a clause in the Bill that ensures that her government can’t use antiquated Henry VIII powers to go back and punch holes in worker protections on the quiet, without parliamentary scrutiny.

“And the Prime Minister must also ensure protecting workers’ rights is at the heart of the UK’s future trade deal with the EU. The UK should sign up to a level playing field with our EU partners – not a race to the bottom on workplace rights. We don’t want hardworking Brits to miss out on new rights that workers in other European nations get.” 

Author: Editorial Team

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